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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

3 edition of Benefits accruing from the Hetch Hetchy Project, San Francisco water supply found in the catalog.

Benefits accruing from the Hetch Hetchy Project, San Francisco water supply

Nelson Andrew Eckart

Benefits accruing from the Hetch Hetchy Project, San Francisco water supply

by Nelson Andrew Eckart

  • 119 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by American Water Works Association in [New York, N.Y.? .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Water-supply -- California -- San Francisco.,
  • San Francisco (Calif.) -- Water-supply.,
  • Hetch Hetchy Valley (Calif.)

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesJournal of the American Water Works Association.
    Statementby N. A. Eckart ...
    ContributionsAmerican Water Works Association.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. 1211-1231.
    Number of Pages1231
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23034445M

      Introduced by Congressman John Raker (D-CA), H.R. , also known as the Raker Bill and the Hetch Hetchy Bill, granted San Francisco the right to dam the Hetch Hetchy Valley within Yosemite National Park. The House passed the bill with little debate. The Senate, however, debated the measure extensively before passing the legislation on December 6, The first time San Francisco applied for the water rights to Hetch Hetchy was in After applying annually for years and being denied, the city's argument for Hetch Hetchy was revived by a natural disaster. On Ap , a massive earthquake devastated the city and highlighted the city's need for a stable water supply.

    Hetch Hetchy: A Survey of Water and Power Replacement Concepts U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Mid-Pacific Region February During the summer of , Secretary Hodel directed the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) to prepare a reconnaissance-level review of his Hetch Hetchy restoration study proposal, on behalf of the National Park Service.   The Hetch Hetchy water system, constructed and owned by the city of San Francisco, delivers approximately million gallons of water per day to San Francisco, Alameda, Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. While the Hetch Hetchy reservoir is just one of the nine reservoirs that makes up the mile long regional water system, it holds

    the City's water supply. The water supply would now be owned by San. Francisco citizens. These citizens recognize the aesthetic and recreational values. of Hetch Hetchy, but also view human health and comfort as a priority. Some City. engineers and advocates view the damming of Hetch Hetchy as an improvement on. the scenery.   Opponents in San Francisco and the rest of the Bay Area, which also relies on the reservoir for its water, say that draining Hetch Hetchy will jeopardize the water supply for million residents.


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Benefits accruing from the Hetch Hetchy Project, San Francisco water supply by Nelson Andrew Eckart Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, while providing water to millions of people in the San Francisco Bay Area, also provides visitors with access to spectacular beauty and the wilderness of Yosemite National Park.

Many hiking trails begin from O’Shaughnessy Dam and some of Hetch Hetchy’s most beautiful features are easily seen from the top of the dam.

Hetch Hetchy is the name of a valley, a reservoir and a water system in California in the United glacial Hetch Hetchy Valley lies in the northwestern part of Yosemite National Park and is drained by the Tuolumne thousands of years before the arrival of settlers from the United States in the s, the valley was inhabited by Native Americans who practiced Location: Yosemite National Park, California.

Full Description: "When water from the Sierra Nevada reached the San Francisco Bay area init was greeted by a national celebration after two decades of grueling construction. The Hetch Hetchy Project evolved from a long search for a reliable source of water for San Francisco that began after the Great Earthquake.

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission owns and operates Hetch Hetchy Power, which represents some of the cleanest energy available in California. For over years this system—which utilizes the gravity flow of the City’s water from source to tap—has operated without producing any carbon emissions nor any radioactive byproducts.

Following a fierce nationwide debate led by John Muir and Will Colby of the Sierra Club, the City of San Francisco was authorized by the U.S.

Congress, in the Raker Act ofto construct a dam and reservoir on the Tuolumne River in Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park. the shortcomings of San Francisco’s water supply became clear. City water planners targeted Hetch Hetchy as a dam site for San Francisco’s water supply (Hundley, ).

San Francisco’s voters approved the construction of a dam in Hetch Hetchy Valley by an 86 percent majority vote in (Sierra Club, ). There is a brief but interesting account of the history of the National Park Service and Yosemite; a quick sketch of John Muir; and then a history of the politics of San Francisco as it relates to Hetch Hetchy and the city's water supply/5(5).

O'Shaughnessy Dam is a foot ( m) high concrete arch-gravity dam in Tuolumne County, California, in the United impounds the Tuolumne River, forming the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir at the lower end of Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park, about miles ( km) east of San Francisco.

The dam and reservoir are the source for the Hetch Hetchy Location: Tuolumne County, California, United States. O'Shaughnessy, City Engineer. San Francisco, California, October, HISTORY OF HETCH HETCHY WATER SUPPLY By M.

O'Shaughnessy, City Engineer EARLY SOURCES OF SAN FRANCISCO'S WATER SUPPLY AN FRANCISCO'S earliest water supply was taken from wells within the City, and ten million gallons daily are still obtained from this source.

At the Tesla plant, the lights will run nonstop to treat million gallons a day as the water wends from the pristine Hetch Hetchy high country to million customers and contractors in San.

However, even if Hetch Hetchy Reservoir is drained (with its water to be stored elsewhere and the valley restoration begins), Yosemite will still not be “whole.” Lake Eleanor is another reservoir with another Dam and within the boundary of Yosemite National Park and also part of the “Hetch Hetchy water system” for San Francisco.

The Hetch Hetchy Reservoir in Yosemite National Park supplies water to San Francisco and other Bay Area cities. (Lauren Sommer/KQED) If you live in San Francisco -- or even certain parts of Alameda, Santa Clara and San Mateo counties -- a portion of your drinking water travels over miles to get to your tap.

A diagram of the Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System, which provides water to Palo Alto, Hayward, San Francisco and other cities in. San Francisco’s water system as it exists today. It’s important to realize that San Francisco’s water system includes nine reservoirs—five in the Bay Area, and four in the Tuolumne watershed.

The five Bay Area reservoirs principally hold runoff from local watersheds and provide about 15% of the total supply of San Francisco’s system. Despite opposition from many citizens, including most of the nation's leading newspapers, Congress passed the Raker Act in allowing the city of San Francisco to destroy Hetch Hetchy.

The City built a dam and reservoir, drowning this beautiful valley, even though other less-damaging sites existed. THE HETCH HETCHY WATER SUPPLY AND POWER PROJECT OF SAN FRANCISCO M.

O'SHAUGHNESSY, Mem. Soc. City Engineer, San Francisco November, 2 THE HETCH HETCHY WATER SUPPLY HETCH HETCHY WATER. San Francisco’s massive Hetch Hetchy water system, which starts in the Park and travels miles, is even able to provide water to about 1, customers in 26 other Bay Area towns and cities, double its number of City of San Francisco customers.

granted, “filtration avoidance” status for hetch hetchy, that is, the water supply meets 1 Before domestic use, water from Lakes Eleanor and Lloyd would require full conventional treatment at the Sunol Valley Filter Plant.

The use of such supplies would impact the community of Groveland, which normally uses Hetch Hetchy water. Silicon Valley business leaders also say that because two-thirds of Hetch Hetchy water customers live outside San Francisco, in places like Palo Alto and north San Jose, they should get to vote, too.

“San Francisco, quite frankly, has a lot of guilt,” says Robert Righter, author of the book, The Battle Over Hetch Hetchy. “You can’t. city in the West, San Francisco was facing a chronic water and power shortage. Inan earthquake and fire devastated San Francisco, adding urgency and public sympathy to the search for an adequate water supply.

Congress passed the Raker Act inauthorizing the construction of a dam in Hetch Hetchy Valley as well asFile Size: 1MB.21st Street, Suite Sacramento, California Telephone () Fax () Contact Us via our website.Between the mid s andSan Francisco’s water supply was controlled by the Spring Valley Water Company.

As one of the most powerful private monopolies in the state, Spring Valley was controlled by, and used largely for the benefit of, the local land barons and financiers who authorized the development of a wide variety of often-destructive hydrologic projects.